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    UA Headed to College!

    According to Joyce Harrison Bahle, a copy of The Upland Almanac will soon be part of an archive, the Jim Harrison collection, at Grand Valley State University in Grand Rapids, Michigan.


    Joyce Bahle, Harrison’s longtime assistant and “aide-de-camp,” gave UA editor Tom Carney the news during a break at “A Really Big Tribute: An Evening of Life, Art and Stories” at the City Opera House on Oct. 21, 2017, in Traverse City, Michigan.

    The late writer Jim Harrison was the subject of a special tribute last October in Traverse City, Michigan. A selection of his writings that appeared in The Upland Almanac will soon be part of his papers at Grand Valley State University. (Photo/with permission from Joyce Harrison Bahle)
    The late writer Jim Harrison was the subject of a special tribute last October in Traverse City, Michigan. A selection of his writings that appeared in The Upland Almanac will soon be part of his papers at Grand Valley State University. (Photo/with permission from Joyce Harrison Bahle)

    In the “Section 799.2” department of the Autumn 2016 issue of the magazine, the first compiled after Harrison’s death, UA featured a collection of excerpts from his nonfiction book of essays, Just Before Dark. All of them dealt with upland game birds – both the hunting and eating of them – and we entitled the group, “Prime Cuts.”

    Special Treat at Symposium
    “Good Science” was not the only offering on the menu at the 11th American Woodcock Symposium held at the Ralph A. MacMullan Conference Center near Roscommon, Michigan, the final weekend in October 2017.
    Hosted by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources (DNR), Ruffed Grouse Society, American Woodcock Society, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the Hall and Jean Glassen Memorial Foundation, the symposium attracted biologists from 20 states and five different countries. Over a three-day period, they presented scientific papers covering the general topics of “Population Assessment,” “Habitat Dynamics,” “Singing Ground Survey Evaluation” and “Management Techniques.” The final afternoon, open to the public, featured a “Special Session for Hunters and Woodcock Enthusiasts.”
    After a week of such heavy-duty, technical topics, however, the talk turned to “Good Books.”
    Glen Blackwood, “Pages Past” columnist for The Upland Almanac, treated participants to a tour of the “Top 10 Timberdoodle Titles.”
    At the 11th American Woodcock Symposium held in Roscommon, Michigan, last fall, UA “Pages Past” columnist Glen Blackwood shared his choice of “Top 10” books about woodcock, which included A Fall of Woodcock by frequent UA contributor Tom Huggler. (Photo/Tailfeather Communications, LLC)
    At the 11th American Woodcock Symposium held in Roscommon, Michigan, last fall, UA “Pages Past” columnist Glen Blackwood shared his choice of “Top 10” books about woodcock, which included A Fall of Woodcock by frequent UA contributor Tom Huggler. (Photo/Tailfeather Communications, LLC)

    Informed by history, tradition and to no small degree by his personal opinions on the topic, Blackwood offered up a list of the best woodcock books. He thought he could provide a better assessment by keeping the technical books separate from the literary, so he provided his top five in two categories, “Biological & Instructional” and “Lyrical.” And to make matters more specific – or worse for people whose favorites don’t appear here – he included only books that were devoted 100 percent to woodcock; no “grouse and woodcock” or general “upland game birds” collections.
    He has promised to share the same discussion with UA readers in a future column – or two.

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